Category: P6 News

P6 Hosts Successful 2016 Annual Meeting

P6 Annual Meeting 1What happens when 25 cooperators from 12 co-ops meet? A bold vision for the future of the cooperative trade movement, we discovered at the 2016 P6 Annual Meeting.

The P6 team was excited to host the Annual Meeting in the P6 home base of Minneapolis, welcoming peers from near and far. The newest P6 members, Moscow Food Co-op of Moscow, ID, and The Good Earth Food Co-op of St. Cloud, MN, joined for the first time. The meeting took place on May 19th and 20th.

The conference began with tours of the new Seward Co-op Friendship Store and of the newly remodeled Eastside Food Co-op. Attendees had tons of questions about the tools these P6 experts use to promote small, local, and cooperative products.

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After the store tours, we held a celebratory dinner at the Seward Co-op Creamery Cafe. In addition to recognizing all the great work P6 members have done this year, the dinner served as an opportunity to welcome non-P6 member co-op representatives interested to learn more about P6. The Creamery Cafe staff did a great job highlighting P6 producers, with special focus on our P6 wholesale members.

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On Friday, with the help of expert facilitators from Growthworks, Inc., we put our heads together to plan for the growth of the P6 movement. This packed day of activities allowed members to brainstorm for improvements at their own co-ops and share best practices. Additionally, we collected perspectives about the best way the P6 national team can meet collective goals.

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Many thanks to the P6 producers who donated product to help make a successful meeting: Maple Valley Co-op, Farmer Direct Co-op, Organic Valley, WiscoPop!, Peace Coffee, Seafood Producers Co-op, and Equal Exchange. Thank you for supporting the movement!

A General Manager’s Perspective on P6

Sean Doyle Seward Co-op General ManagerThis testimonial from Seward Co-op’s General Manager Sean Doyle demonstrates the value of P6 in a retail co-op environment. 

When Seward Co-op helped create P6, we were  looking for a way to help clarify for staff throughout the organization the products that meet our highest values from the perspective of “who’s making this food?” and how the answer to that question aligns with the mission or ends of the co-op. As a policy governance co-op, we are an ends-driven organization. The decision to participate was made through a lot of conversation – it couldn’t just be me as the General Manager, or just the marketing department. P6 takes on a life of its own in terms of helping employees at all levels, but especially front-line employees, make informed and quick decisions to direct customers towards products that meet their values. We’ve heard over the years that customers are upset about the consolidation in the natural foods industry. P6 is a quick and easy way that frontline employees can direct customers to products that are not corporate owned. It also helps employees that make product selection decisions. It helps us prioritize our decisions about which products get what space on the shelves.

As we’ve continued to grow with the opening of the second store and the café and the production facility, P6 has made it possible to transfer our co-op’s values to our new staff. It is a really simple and powerful. By focusing on three criteria—small, local, and cooperative—employees grasp our competitive advantage quickly and fully.

I think P6 needs to live throughout the whole co-op. I’ve seen co-ops try to implement it purely as a marketing program, and it doesn’t work so well. There’s a depth to P6. It’s very nuanced. For it to be fully successful, everyone needs to understand what the story is. It takes training and it takes resources upfront, but once P6 is in place, it really helps take the co-op and the whole economy in the direction we want to see. From my perspective as the General Manager, it’s accomplishing our goals of better communicating with our customers about the story behind the products we’re selling.

P6 connects the work we’re doing here at Seward with an international set of principles. Based on the 6th Cooperative Principle—Cooperation among Cooperatives.  By having local as a primary criteria, P6 also fulfills the 7th principle, which is Concern for Community. It goes all the way from the macro level to the micro level. What we’ve seen here at Seward Co-op is that it provides a lot of meaning to our staff. Stocking products on a shelf can be mundane. P6 connects this everyday work into a vision for the whole organization within the context of the international cooperative principles. It also ties back to the historical founding purpose of natural foods co-ops in being a vehicle for social change.

P6 functions for us as an alignment tool. Our co-op has become a larger employer with nearly 400 employees. It is too big at this point for me as a General Manager to connect with individual employees and have deep conversations about our values as a business. Having P6 at Seward allows for the values, the ends, and the co-op principles to be more transparent and to manifest these in the organization in a way that’s more powerful than we ever anticipated. P6 helps our employees at every level tie into the larger meaning of their work.

Farmer Direct Co-op on the shelves at Viroqua Food Co-op

This post by Bjorn Bergman originally appeared on the Viroqua Food Co-op website. A longer profile of Farmer Direct Co-op, the newest P6 member, is coming soon. 

A small, but revolutionary change took place in our bulk section this year. When it comes to bulk grains, beans, lentils and seeds, we have struggled to find reliable P6 producers to supply our Co-op. Needless to say, it was with great excitement this past spring when the National P6 Office set up a call to introduce P6 retail co-ops (including VFC) to Farmer Direct Co-op, a producer of organic bulk grains, beans, lentils and seeds. After a few more months of working out distribution logistics, this summer we got our first shipment of organic bulk steel cut oats, green lentils, French lentils, small red beans and golden flax seed from Farmer Direct Co-op.2016-Farmer-Direct-Co-op-Postcard.jpg
At the national level, this is a huge victory for Principle Six – as a movement! From the beginning of its creation, P6 had a vision of creating more “Producer Co-op-to-Food Co-op” trade relationships. This connection with Farmer Direct is the first time we have seen one of those “co-op to co-op” relationships evolve and result in new P6 products being stocked at the VFC. A big P6 Win!

With the introduction of Farmer Direct Co-op bulk foods at VFC, we wanted to take some time to share with you why we are so excited about carrying their products.

Farmer Direct Co-op started in 2002 when Jason Freeman (current General Manager) and three organic hempseed farmers formed the business as a way to create more crop price transparency for organic family farmers on the Canadian prairies. The Co-op quickly became popular and more farmers started to join.Today, the co-op is owned by 60 family farms located throughout Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada.

As Farmer Direct Co-op sales have grown, they became interested in establishing a process and certification for assuring fair crop prices to its farmer-owners. This led them to Domestic Fair Trade Certification (a.k.a. fairDeal). Domestic Fair Trade Certification assures that organic farmers receive fair prices for their crops and that farm workers receive a living wage. In 2010, they became the first food business in North America to receive Domestic Fair Trade Certification.

Farmer Direct Co-op is the only company in North America to combine all three attributes of farmer ownership, domestic fair trade, and organics – all under one brand. When you purchase Farmer Direct Co-op products from our bulk section, you are supporting 60 organic family farms, as well as 11 employees. To learn more about Farmer Direct Co-op, check out their website.

Next time you pass through our bulk section, look for and support Farmer Direct Co-op by purchasing their fantastic P6 grains, beans, lentils and seeds.

Farmer Direct Co-op bulk bins at Viroqua Food Co-op

 

Update from the Grow Together Fund

IMG_20151201_114003In 2014, Equal Exchange convened six grocery co-ops, including Seward Co-op and Eastside Food Co-op, to create the Grow Together Fund to support a cashew growing co-op in El Salvador called Aprainores. These co-ops donated approximately $5,000 each to Aprainores in a special coop-to-coop development fund project.  The money was used to help them start a Revolving Loan Fund to give low-interest credit to their members to tide them over until the harvest. Because much of Central America experienced a severe drought last summer which destroyed their corn and other subsistence crops, farmers were particularly hard hit.  This fund helped the farmers buy food for their families and work on their own farms, rather than have to hire themselves out as day laborers on other farms. Equal Exchange also donated funds to help improve productivity through the planting of additional trees, and technical assistance enabling 15 new farmers to join the coop, and additional acreage to be converted to organic production.

Here’s a report from the farm on their progress, thanks to the Grow Together Fund:

We would like to briefly mention how Equal Exchange has helped us to improve our cooperative!!

We started working with Equal Exchange in 2013. Since then, we have been so blessed with their support and we have increased our technical and productive capabilities.

  • Before Equal Exchange started working with us, we were only processing 2800 quintales (100 pound bags) of raw cashew nuts because our land certified as organic was only 163 Manzanas (113 Hectares) (280 acres). This last year we hired an agriculture technician to give follow up to a new group of cashew farmers. These farmers were already producing cashew nuts, but were not organically certified, so we put our efforts toward giving them technical assistance in organic agriculture and we got them certified.IMG_20151201_123255
  • We increased our production of organic cashew nuts from 3000 to 3500 quintales.
  • We increased our annual sales from $350,000 to $425,000; this was because we had more organic cashews available.
  • We increased labor in our factory one month longer than usual (80 people at the processing plant) providing badly needed jobs for women in the area.
  • We added 15 new members in the department of Usulután. We now have 62 members.
  • We have planted 700 new trees (in new areas that represents 10 new hectares) (25 acres).
  • 700 old trees were cut and new seedlings were created by grafting new shoots onto the old trees.IMG_20151201_122537
  • We have created a Revolving Loan Fund to make credit available for farmers. We have available a credit line for small cashew farmers who receive pre-finance to do maintenance work on their cashew farms before the harvest time. This helps them increase productivity of their farm and feed their families while they are waiting for the harvest.

 

On behalf of our cashew farmers, and workers, we thank you and wish that you keep growing and supporting small farmers, not only us, but also all the small producers who really need support to produce the food of the world.

Congratulations to Aprainores on their progress!