Category: Producer Profile

Cooperatives Grow Communities: Riojana Olive Oil

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In the town of Arauco in the La Rioja province of Argentina stands the oldest olive tree in the country, planted in the 1600s. Although not native to Argentina, the Arauco olive is highly prized for its buttery smoothness and meaty texture, and for the robust floral and fruity flavor notes it contributes to olive oil.

There, in the Antinaco-Los Colorados Valley, the cooperative producers of Riojana extra virgin, fair trade organic olive oil are cultivating much more than their 350 olive trees. Through cooperation, they are growing a healthy, vibrant and sustainable community.

When you purchase Riojana olive oil you are not just purchasing a delicious ingredient to enjoy, you are casting a vote in favor of cooperative, fair trade businesses—and helping more than 422 cooperative members continue to invest in a brighter future.

Reinvesting profits for health and education

La Riojana’s founders came from Italy to Argentina in the 1940s and began cultivating grapes for the production of wine, and planting olive trees as a natural companion plant. Certified fair trade by Fairtrade International in 2006, the members of the cooperative have invested more than $11 million Argentinian pesos (~ $730,000 US), primarily from the sale of their fair trade organic wines, in projects including a new drinking water supply for the village of Tilimuqui, where many of La Riojana’s workers and their families live. The fair trade premium has also been invested in production improvements, new community centers and medical equipment, but the most visible result of the cooperative’s reinvestment in its farmer members and their families can be seen in their commitment to education.

A new secondary school specializing in agriculture opened in Tilimuqui in 2010. Offering free education to children age 13-18, the school has had a profound impact on its community, providing a catalyst for local development, increasing employment by the creation of more than 50 new jobs at the school, and providing training in technical agronomy to help slow the migration of young people to larger cities. Since 2010, enrollment in the school has grown from 33 pupils to more than 300. With plans to build new classrooms, the cooperative hopes to expand the school’s capacity to 600 students in the next few years. The cooperative also provides kits of school supplies to children of its members, as well as free computer courses to adult community members.

Focusing on environment to ensure a bright future

Besides supporting health and education, the cooperative is invested in green initiatives and sustainability, so transitioning more of its growers to become equivalency USDA Certified Organic is another important goal. With a focus on becoming carbon neutral, La Riojana Cooperative is introducing improved water management techniques, the use of solar and bio energy and a reforestation project.

Source: http://strongertogether.coop/article/cooperatives-grow-communities-riojana-olive-oil

Pachamama: A Different Kind Of Coffee Co-op

P6 is excited to announce our newest member: Pachamama Coffee Cooperative. Pachamama roasts delicious single-origin coffees and blends, but their high quality isn’t the only special thing about them. Pachamama is a 100% farmer-owned cooperative.  (Keep reading to the end of this post to find out how to get a year of free Pachamama coffee!)

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Like P6, Pachamama is a cooperative of other cooperatives. Five small-scale farmer cooperatives in Mexico, Peru, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Ethiopia own the business. This gives the farmers direct ownership over the brand all the way from the farm to your cup. Pachamama’s board of directors is made up entirely of farmer representatives, meaning that farmers not only own the business, they control the business.

Farmers grow, select and export beans directly to the roaster they own in California. From there, the coffee is roasted daily and shipped directly to customers throughout the United States. Unlike most coffee businesses, all of this supply chain is owned by the farmers. By retaining ownership of their coffee – roasting and branding it themselves, and then selling directly to customers – farmers now have greater incentive to produce even better organic coffee next year. It’s a win-win-win for the farmer, the consumer and the environment.

p6_familia_guatemalaPachamama seeks to transcend and exceed the debate about fair trade vs. direct trade coffee by simply providing great coffee that comes directly from the farmers themselves. Pachamama appeals to coffee connoisseurs seeking the most nuanced flavors and to those who simply wish to support farmers that have invested in roasting and selling their own coffee for a change.

Pachamama offers several coffee subscription options for gifts, homes and for offices. This coffee CSA service offers consumers a direct path to supporting farmers and the opportunity to sample a variety of high-quality single origin coffees and blends, delivered monthly.

P6 is teaming up with Pachamama to offer two fantastic deals right now. First, you can win a year of free coffee by going to our Instagram and sharing our giveaway post. Second, everyone can get 20% off all Pachamama Coffee purchases from now until 12/19 by using the offer code P6HOLIDAY at pacha.coop.

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Producer Profile: Deep Rooted

This post about Deep Rooted by Bjorn Bergman of Viroqua Food Co-op first appeared on their website

Many would argue that the first true taste of summer is that of a sun-ripened local tomato. Lucky for us, that first Deep Rooted greenhousetaste of summer comes sooner at the VFC thanks to Deep Rooted, our local supplier of certified organic tomatoes. Outside of Westby, Wisconsin, this is our main local tomato producer, which is why we want to share their story with you.

Deep Rooted is owned and run by Tiffany Cade and Jimmy Fackert. They met in 2011 when their families crossed paths while on vacation in the US Virgin Islands. Following meeting abroad, Tiffany and Jimmy kept in touch and started dating.

From the beginning, both Tiffany and Jimmy were interested in organic food production. Tiffany was working for a CSA farm in Chicago and Jimmy grew up in a family that valued gardening and growing food. Less than a year into their relationship, Tiffany’s stepfather Brian passed away in the summer of 2012 leaving Ski Hill Greenhouses in Westby without a main operator. At that time, they were both looking to move somewhere together so Tiffany and Jimmy decided to take the leap. In January of 2013, they moved to Westby, started growing their first tomato seeds, and Deep Rooted was born!

They founded Deep Rooted because they both saw a problem with the way the conventional produce and food is grown, processed and distributed. They thought that through experimentation and combining modern technologies with more traditional methods that they could create a better way of growing and providing food for the local community, efficiently and sustainably.

They followed in the footsteps of Ski Hill Greenhouses and continue to offer a wide variety of flowers. The biggest changes in the farm since they have taken over are the switch to pesticide-free and organic production and the addition of growing certified organic greenhouse tomatoes. Their tomatoes are the earliest and latest available local tomatoes around.

Viroqua Food Co-op has been a big supporter of Deep Rooted since their first season. In 2013, VFC was their first retail account for their tomatoes. In 2015, VFC awarded Deep Rooted a $1,250 P6 Microloan to test two different growing mediums for organic tomato production in their greenhouses. This trial helped them identify which soil mix grows the healthiest organic plants and, as a result, the best tasting tomatoes.

The couple is, understandably, serious about tomatoes. While they love all the tomatoes they grow, they do have a number of favorites. Tiffany’s favorites include Sun Gold Cherry, German Stripe and Abe Lincoln, while Jimmy loves Black Cherry, Cherokee Purple, and German Stripe. Each year they grow new varieties to see if they can find a new favorite for themselves and their customers.

The 2016 growing season marks their fourth year of operation with some exciting changes on the horizon. They are growing a new tomato this year called Sun Peach, a pink cherry tomato that is a sister variety to Sun Gold. This past April, they offered more spring planting classes than ever and this summer they hope to host a number of events on their farm, including a tomato tasting. Keep your eyes on their website and Facebook page for more details if you are interested in attending one of their events.

When purchasing tomatoes, you are supporting Jimmy and Tiffany, a second generation family farm as well as their one seasonal full time employee, Hannah Eddy. In the future, they hope to keep growing so that Deep Rooted can support at least three families with meaningful employment, wages and benefits.

Tiffany and Jimmy sum it up best. “We love what we do. There is nothing quite as gratifying after a full day’s work than knowing that you were a part of putting healthy, nutritious, delicious food on another family’s table.”

Have you had a Deep Rooted organic tomato? Stop by the VFC and pick up a pint or a pound, May through October. We have a variety of their slicer, heirloom and cherry tomatoes. VFC also carries
their annual and perennial flowers and certified organic vegetable and herb seedlings each spring and early summer in the VFC Greenhouse.

Deep Rooted also sells their tomatoes and flowers at the Viroqua Farmers Market and Cameron Park Farmers Market (Downtown, La Crosse), to numerous area restaurants and a variety of other local retail outlets. Learn more at www.deeprootedorganics.com.

Farmer Direct Cooperative: A New Kind of Co-op

P6 was honored to bring Farmer Direct Cooperative (FDC) on board as a member last year. FDC has been operating in Canada since 2002 but is just beginning to bring their products — beans, grains, and oilseeds — to the American market.

I spoke with founder and Director Jason Freeman and Retail Sales & Marketing Coordinator Katherine Gee about their co-op’s story.

Farmer Direct All Member MeetingFarmer Direct Cooperative was founded by Jason and three farmers in 2002. Jason had been operating a small organic food company and upon its sale was approached by the farmers he had been working with to market more of their crops. The farmers faced unfair pricing, poor logistics, and a lack of transparency. They collaborated with Jason to build a cooperative that would let them sell their crops, which included flaxseed, lentils, hempseed and peas, in a fair and direct way.

The Canadian prairies have a strong cooperative history, particularly for farmers. Farmer Direct Cooperative’s board president, Kevin Bristow, grew up watching his father run member services for a large conventional farmer co-op. What Farmer Direct Cooperative brings that is new is their commitment to their three attributes:

  • 100% Farmer Owned
  • 100% Certified Organic
  • 100% Domestic Fair Trade Certified

No other business boasts all three attributes, so let’s take some time to dig into what they all mean.

Farmer Owned

John Finnie & SonOrganizing as a cooperative, or farmer-owned businesses, was a bit of a no-brainer for the farmers. The strong culture of cooperatives in the area laid the groundwork, so when the farmers decided to come together, they knew they wanted one member, one vote; open and voluntary membership; and a way to participate fairly in an economic endeavor. What other way than through a cooperative? Their board president summed up why he joined the co-op as: “I believe in cooperatives, I believe in fairness, I believe in transparency. Collectively we have more strength, more advantage, more opportunity.”

Certified Organic

All 60 family farms that are member-owners of Farmer Direct Cooperative are fully organic. Most of them have been organic for at least 10 years. None of FDC’s members are “split operations,” or farms that grow both conventional and organic products. The strong commitment to only selling organic products is one of the big draws that brings farmers into the cooperative.

Domestic Fair Trade Certified

Farmer Direct Cooperative FamilyWhile running an organic farmers’ co-op was already innovative, Farmer Direct Cooperative made the decision over the last few years to continue their leadership in the field by certifying all their farmers Domestic Fair Trade. Farmer Direct Cooperative was the first business in North America to receive that certification, which ensures that business in North America are treating workers fairly and farmers are paid a fair price.

Jason said that change in any co-op can often cause members to split off. Despite the high reporting and auditing requirements that come with Domestic Fair Trade Certification, only two farmers left the co-op when the decision was made to bring the label on board. The overwhelming majority of FDC farmers saw this new certification as an important way they could push the industry in a fairer direction.

Another change for Farmer Direct Cooperative is their recent decision to expand into the US market. Joining P6 as the first international member was one step in their process to get connected to the players in the US market. Katherine, who serves as the primary liaison to P6, shared that building relationships with co-ops around the US and learning about the landscape and distribution here has been a huge advantage.

Farmer Direct Cooperative products on the shelf at Viroqua Food Co-opThrough their membership in P6 and the advocacy of our members, Farmer Direct Cooperative was able to get their products into the Co-op Partners Warehouse, which serves co-ops and other grocery stores all over the Upper Midwest. This type of distribution, which goes from a farmer co-op to a warehousing co-op to a grocery co-op, begins to build the co-op to co-op supply chain that’s at the heart of P6’s vision and a big part of the world Farmer Direct Cooperative is trying to build.

Jason and Katherine shared their visions for a more P6 world. Jason emphasized that co-ops may never fully replace conventional businesses, but that they serve as a crucial foil for the current system. In a P6 world, democratically owned businesses will drive corporations to better behavior through competition as the public gets more experience with cooperatives. There has to be an alternative to the rampant greed that leads to exploitation along the supply chain. Katherine foresees a world where co-op made is the preference and customers are knowledgeable and excited about cooperatives.

Jason and Katherine are optimistic about the long-term impacts of P6 on their co-op. We are extremely excited to continue to grow with them. You can learn more about Farmer Direct Cooperative at their website.

P6 Producer: Roots In Bloom

This article about Roots in Bloom by Andrew of Ozark Natural Foods originally appeared on their website

roots in bloomOnce upon a time you could find Mee McGill sitting at the Owner Services Desk, smiling wide at everyone who walked through the door. Mee has since moved on to become the Assistant Wellness Manager, but you can still see her throughout the store with her signature smile and perpetual cheer.

In addition to her position at ONF, she and her husband own and operate Roots in Bloom Farm, a Certified Naturally Grown farm and homestead nestled in the Boston Mountains in West Fork, AR. Roots in Bloom is an off-grid, sustainable teaching farm dedicated to providing naturally grown food and wellness products to the community and world. Roots in Bloom is passionate about healthy values, nutritious food, sustainability, and helping others in need. They provide Certified Naturally Grown produce and herbs to ONF, in addition to local nurseries and through community-supported agriculture (CSA) programs. They also offer workshops, DIY kits, and other value-added products such as all-natural bug sprays, healing salves, and sunscreen. We sell many of Roots in Bloom’s products at ONF, and I can personally attest that their products work very well. I was duly impressed with her bug spray when I went for a hike one day back in mid-summer. RIB sunscreen is also recommended for protecting your sensitive skin against the sun’s harmful UV rays. We will also soon be carrying their Baby Bum Heal diaper rash cream, in addition to an all-natural ConChest rub to battle the nasty congestion one gets during cold and flu season. One of their most exciting products is their Sustainable Lifeline DIY Tincture Kits. If you’ve ever wanted to try your hand at making your own tinctures, then these are for you.

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In addition to her work at ONF and Roots in Bloom, Mee is also a doula, a medical assistant, CNA, and Master Herbalist. According to Mee, “I am a mother of two wonderful young women who I provided home education to for several years. Following this stage of my life, I felt it was time to expand my skills and offer assistance to the community who supported my choice to home school. I followed my dream and received my certification as a Master Herbalist. I was so interested in the things that I learned that I wanted to further my education in the medical field. I felt this would give me a better understanding of “conventional” medicine and the differences between that and “alternative” medicine. I received my nurse assistant certification and became a medical assistant as well. After spending some time figuring out where I wanted to aim my focus, I went back to work for the natural food co-op in my area and began the development of this farm. I have become more passionate about natural wellness and healthy food. It is my desire to share the knowledge and abilities I have gained with others. Currently, I offer doula and in-home care services, herbal consultations, workshops which teach about home herbalism, and working hard to develop Roots in Bloom to create a healthier future for my community.”

Roots in Bloom currently has a Crowdfund campaign to purchase a waterwheel that will be used to produce electricity. Any remaining funds will be allocated to improving the wellness aspect of their business. You can also find Roots in Bloom on social media, including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter. Their website is www.rootsinbloom.weebly.com.

As you can see, Mee is a valuable asset to our food co-op and Fayetteville community, and we are so grateful to have her on our team!