Category: Producer Profile

P6 Profile: War Eagle Mill

This post by Mariah from Ozark Natural Foods originally appeared on their website

War Eagle Mill is our local P6 mill located in Rogers and “organic, natural, and non-GMO” are their favorite words! “Our flour comes to you the War Eagle way – stone ground slowly to preserve all the nutrients and the deep, rich taste. Our farmers are committed to maintaining a natural, organic, and non-GMO environment for growing grain, and work hand-in-hand with us to shorten the time between the field, the milling process, and your table.  Since 1832 to today, we remain committed to you and your family’s health. You are our first priority.” Sounds like some good Arkansas family to me!

Let me start by giving a short history of this beautiful place. Sylvanus and Catherine got married at a young age and when they decided it was time to get a place of their own Sylvanus went out west from Tennessee in search of the perfect spot. He found this spot, a beautiful valley next to the War Eagle Creek in Arkansas. Through floods, the Civil War, and many other obstacles, this family has kept the mill going!

We carry a wide variety of their amazing products. In bulk you’ll find brown rice flour, rye flour, unbleached bread flour, wheat bran, and a few others. These are the perfect ingredients for your personal family recipes. In packaged grocery we carry their honey-nut bread mix, hot roll mix, biscuit mix (my personal favorite for a hardy serving of biscuits and gravy), and yellow cornbread mix. You won’t find a more lovely addition to your holiday meals!

War Eagle Mill reminds us of our roots; there’s an Arkansan ready for some homemade and homegrown soul-warming comfort breads in all of us. A mouthful I know, but that’s exactly what you’ll want when you try these rich, local products. I highly recommend that you look up the history of this mill; it’s truly interesting considering that it’s right down the road! This holiday season, fill your family and friends (literally) with the love from War Eagle Mill!

 

Producer Profile: Apple Seeds Teaching Farm

This post by Julie from the A La Carte Department at Ozark Natural Foods.

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When I started working at ONF nearly three years ago, there was a giant empty field next to the co-op. I remember thinking that it was odd that a huge lot was sitting empty in the middle of town. Then I learned that it was to become a teaching farm operated by Apple Seeds, a non-profit organization focused on the Farm to School movement. Here local school children can learn about gardening, cooking, and the healthy benefits of eating fresh vegetables. Having resided in Berkeley, CA, where Alice Waters began the first teaching garden in the United States, I was already familiar with the benefits of this educational format, not just for the children but for the community as a whole. I was thrilled that the concept was catching on right here in Northwest Arkansas.

With the support and hard work of local businesses, community members, school partners, and of course kids, they transformed that empty field into a thriving teaching farm. Now it is home to more than 5,000 square feet of gardens, an outdoor classroom, and a team that provides garden-based programs to students. Their farm programs, including Farm Lab and Farm to Table, are hands-on, fun, academically rich, and inspire young students to make healthy food choices.

Since 2014, they have grown more than 3,000 pounds of produce. The veggies have found their way to local school garden markets and their burgeoning Farm to School program, as well as their annual fundraisers and to Ozark Natural Foods, a long-standing partner and neighbor. Some of the produce that ONF sells from Apple Seeds are tomatoes, bok choy, herbs, peppers, cucumbers, and eggplant. Apple Seeds is passionate about their mission of inspiring healthy living through garden-based education. By building Apple Seeds Teaching Farm in the center of town, they can better serve the needs of our growing community.

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Now, when I take my breaks at work, I go outside and see teachers and children roaming the gardens, leading and learning. I can actually hear the excitement in their young voices as they volunteer for a task. I see the staff tending to the rows of plants, pulling weeds, and covering them when the weather turns. I’ve watched the garden beds transform from rows of soil into tall sunflowers, lush tomato plants, and other delightful veggies. I’m so grateful for this beautiful view, but even more so that Apple Seeds is providing the next generation with the knowledge and skills to grow and be healthy.

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Producer Profile: Fazenda Boa Terra

This blog post by Bjorn Bergman originally appeared on Viroqua Food Co-op’s website.

This month we are highlighting a relatively new producer to Viroqua Food Co-op. Fazenda Boa Terra is a certified organic producefarm located just outside Spring Green, WI owned and operated by Lidia Dungue and John Middleton.

Lidia grew up in Santa Barbara, Brazil. She received a degree in agronomics from UNESP Ilha Solteria and worked for fertilizer companies after college. After being less than inspired by this work, she decided to travel to the United States to get some practical experience working on farms. A full year apprenticeship on an organic vegetable farm was a huge turning point in her life. After getting a degree that was in line with and supported conventional agriculture, her eyes were opened to the fact that organic farming truly does work. Following this experience, she had the dream of owning and running her own organic farm.

John Middleton grew up in the hills and forests of upstate New York dairy country. From his earliest years he was surrounded by chickens, dairy goats, pigs, fruit trees, a large garden, and plenty of forests, all of which gave him a deep appreciation and love of the natural world. Another part of his youth was spent playing farmer with his grandfather, learning handy and mechanical work.

After high school, he attended Rochester Institute of Technology and got a degree in Environmental Science hoping to pursue a career in conservation biology research. By the end of college, he had a deep understanding of the link between nature, environment, society and agriculture. This led him to an interest in being a farmer.

John and Lidia met in 2007 while working on organic farms in upstate New York. Since meeting they have been inseparable. They both realized their collective dreams of farming in 2010, when they started a farm business together. After four years of farming collectively, they were approached by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesin Preservation, Inc. and Otter Creek Organic Farm to lead a joint venture to start an organic vegetable farm at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin in Spring Green. In 2014, the couple started their farming venture and they are currently focusing on establishing the infrastructure, building community ties and developing their markets.

In the future, Fazenda Boa Terra hopes to create a model organic farm at Taliesin where beginning and advanced farmers alike, along with consumers, can learn about efficient farming systems, equipment and investment strategies that are highly productive and profitable on an organic farm. They hope to do this through the development of a rigorous residential apprentice program, on-farm workshops and agro-tourism, while maintaining environmental stewardship, long term sustainability, their passion for nature, and most importantly, their love of healthy soil.

They chose the name Fazenda Boa Terra in honor of Lidia’s home country of Brazil. The English translation equates to “Good Earth Farm” which has a twofold meaning. It applies to their environmental consciousness with a deep desire to harmonize with nature in all of their farming operations. But the primary meaning of “Good Earth Farm” is all about soil. They know healthy soil produces plants healthy enough to naturally resist insect attacks, disease and foul weather. When investing in their soils; they invest in themselves, their customers and their community.

Fazenda Boa Terra sells its produce to a variety of retail outlets including VFC, to restaurants, and at the Spring Green and Hilldale (Madison) Farmers Markets on Saturdays. Next time you are at VFC, be sure to keep your eye out for certified organic produce from Fazenda Boa Terra in our produce section.

Learn more about Fazenda Boa Terra on their website  and their Facebook page.

“My Asian Pears Are Something Special and Here’s Why”

This post, by Guy King Ames, originally appeared on Ozark Natural Foods’ blog.

I’m Guy King Ames, owner of Ames Orchard & Nursery here in Northwest Arkansas. I’m also a horticulturist with ATTRA, the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (www.attra.ncat.org ), a project of the National Center for Appropriate Technology, Fayetteville office. In the latter capacity, I write bulletins and give presentations on organic production of fruits for the whole country (go to the above-linked site to see these publications, webinars, etc.). The reason I mention this is that I have a pretty good handle on organic fruit production in the various parts of the United States.

If you’ve ever wondered why most of the organic apples and other tree fruits at ONF come from Washington, Oregon, and California, it’s really quite simple. The commercial fruit growers in those states, organic and otherwise, are growing fruit in what is essentially the irrigated desert. In that environment there are very few diseases, and if they are present, they occur with much less severity. Same for insect pests: fewer and less severe outbreaks. In such an environment, organic culture of fruit is relatively easy…relative to the eastern half of the U.S., where the higher humidity and rainfall fosters a plethora of diseases and pests.

Organic (or Certified Naturally Grown, as is my farm) fruit culture in the East is quite difficult. It’s even more difficult in the South where the higher heat favors fruit tree diseases like fire blight of pears and apples, black rot of grapes, summer rots of apples, brown rot of plums and peaches, and the list goes on. And there’s a similarly daunting list of insect pests.
So, you might think, why not just grow the tree fruits organically out in the West and truck them back East? Ah, go back and re-read your copy of Michael Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma (http://michaelpollan.com/books/the-omnivores-dilemma/)! The “food-miles” for such a system are insane and represent a huge cost to the environment, including a large contribution to global climate change. Moreover—and something I don’t remember Pollan spending much time on—the irrigation for the thousands upon thousands of acres of tree fruits in eastern Washington and elsewhere in the West comes from the many dams on the Snake, Columbia, and other important rivers. Important for whom? Salmon. It’s truly not a stretch to say that the ease of organic culture of tree fruits in the West comes at the cost of salmon habitat. It’s an ugly truth that most of us don’t want to face.

I’ve spent almost all of my adult life trying to grow fruit in an environmentally-sound way here in Northwest Arkansas. Nature has kicked my butt from Yellville to Fayetteville, but I’ve figured out a few things along the way. One of those is that I can grow certain pear varieties, including Asian pears, without any sprays whatsoever! I still suffer large losses to insects and diseases, but I can bring delicious Asian pears to Ozark Natural Foods with just a minimum of cosmetic imperfections—and I hope you’ll take those few dings and dimples as a sign that these are pesticide-free and yummy.

I really hope you will try some of these locally-grown pears. The small, yellow-gold ones are Shinkos (from Japan) and have a sprightly sweetness with a touch of citrus. The large, dark orange-bronze ones are Korean Giants and they are big sugar bombs! Both are crisp and refreshing. And they’re grown right here in your own neighborhood!

 

LüSa Organics: P6 Producer Profile

This post by Viroqua Food Co-op’s Bjorn Bergman first appeared on their website

In her 20’s, Rachel Wolf was captivated by the concept of soapmaking. The idea of taking simple, raw wolves-2014materials and through chemistry (and maybe a little magic) turning them into something to clean and nourish the skin sounded wonderful. After years of reading about soapmaking, she mustered up the courage and taught herself. With a group of friends, she made her first batch of soap in 1997. Things just snowballed from there.

That same year, Rachel started Queen Bee’s Earthly Delights, which produced natural soaps and other body care products. This small business venture/hobby was a lot for the Wolf family at the time – Rachel worked full time as an environmental educator and her husband Pete worked full time as a solar electric system electrician.

In 2002, Rachel and Pete had their first child, and the couple decided to take a leap. Rachel quit her job so that she could focus on raising their son. In her spare time, she continued to make and sell Queen Bee’s Products at farmers markets, as well as to friends and neighbors. At this time, she also began making body care products specifically for pregnant women and babies.

In 2006, with their daughter on the way, Pete quit his job so that they could focus all their energy on raising their children and growing their business. In 2008, they changed the name of their venture to LüSa Organics to combine their baby and body care products all under one brand. The namesake is inspired by their two children, Lupine and Sage.

Today, LüSa Organics is a small, but growing local business. They offer a full line of natural body care products that aim to enrich lives through the pleasure and the positive impact of their business practices. They handcraft a full line of soaps, balms, sugar scrubs, and essential oil blends for adults, babies, and children using the best, primarily organic, ingredients they can from the most ethical sources. That means: local sunflower oil from Driftless Organics and calendula flowers from local growers Harriet Behar and Megan Pierce, fair trade shea butter from a women’s worker-owned cooperative in Togo, and goat milk from their own goat, Melissa. They scent their products exclusively with essential oils and use only natural pigments, herbs, and clays to color those products.

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While they have a full line of body care products, Rachel does have a couple products that are her favorites. “I’m awfully smitten by Da Balm, our new itch balm. I use it on my family’s eczema, on mosquito bites, and any mysterious rashes.” She also says that LüSa Booty Balm, their award winning balm for soothing and healing any kind of rashy/sore skin (diaper rash, cuts, scrapes, windburn, sunburn) will always have a place in her heart as well as her medicine chest.

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Currently, LüSa employs six people (Karen, Angie, Brandi, Jordan, Rachel, and Pete) at their production facility within the Food Enterprise Center in Viroqua, Wisconsin. When you purchase LüSa Products, you are not only getting body care products made with high quality ingredients that also smell great, you are supporting a small, family-owned business that supports six Driftless families that you probably bump into at the VFC every week.

To learn more about LüSa Organics, check out their website at: www.lusaorganics.com While you’re there, be sure to take a peek at Rachel Wolf’s blog about her life at LüSa, being a mother, herbalist, homesteader, homeschooler, and all around rock star.

Next time you are at the VFC, check out the amazing selection of LüSa Organics Products we carry in aisle #5!

Lusa is part of the P6 program at the VFC because:

  • Local: LüSa Organics is located in Viroqua, WI less than one mile from VFC.
  • Small Producer: LüSa Organics is owned by Rachel and Pete Wolf and their products are delivered directly to VFC.